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20121129
20121207
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will push back on president obama's demand for tax hikes on the rich when it comes to the fiscal cliff. but treasury secretary timothy geithner says the white house will not give in. >> no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest americans. remember it's only 2%. >> geithner adds the obama administration is, quote, absolutely prepared to go off the cliff, if necessary. joining me now is van jones, cnn contributor and former obama administration official. good morning. >> god morning to you. >> so, van, i guess my first question that's eatsy for geithner to say, we're perfectly willing to go off the fiscal cliff. that means a tax hike on middle class americans and maybe some of them are thinking this morning i'm not really so happy geithner said that. >> it might have been inartful for him to say it the way he said it. i think he is making a very important point, which is that the american people did vote. they voted for the one thing the president said very clearly, which is that tax rates would go up on the wealthiest. it's an
to get more money from wealthy people. president obama, you know the deal, he wants to raise tax rates for the wealthy. house speaker john boehner wants to close tax loopholes, limit deductions for the wealthy. let's stay on the hill here, let's talk to senior congressional correspondent dana bash. we know the speaker -- we know speaker boehner met with conservative republicans today. did he get any backlash today from his plan? >> reporter: you know what, interestingly it doesn't seem like he did. we know that conservatives are not happy with the idea that their own house republican leadership proposed a plan that includes $800 billion in new revenue. we have seen -- reported on it extensively yesterday and the day before about the e-mail alerts that conservative groups have put out, republican senator jim demint was up-front about the fact he's not happy about it. however, when it comes to speaker boehner's own republican conference, as it is called, we're told they met for an hour and there wasn't backlash, that they were united behind him. it seems as though, brooke, that the speak
the election, president obama reiterated his demand that any deal has to raise taxes on the highest earners. but yesterday the president also appeared to show a little bit of flexibility in lowering those tax rates in the future. take a listen to what he said. >> i don't think that the issue right now has to do with sitting in a room. the issue right now that's relevant is the acknowledgment that if we're going to raise revenues that are sufficient to balance with the very tough cuts that we've already made and the further reforms and entitlements that i'm prepared to make, that we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal -- what i've suggested is, let's essentially put a down payment on taxes. let's let tax rates on the upper income folks go up. and then let's set up a process with a time certain at the end of 2013 or the fall of 2013 where we work on tax reform. we look at what loopholes and deductions both democrats and republicans are willing to close. and it's possible that we may be able to lower rates by broadening the base a
obama's proposal calls for $1.6 trillion in new tax revenue. $50 billion for new stimulus spending. and about $400 billion in entitlement cuts. republicans say, the president's proposal's nothing but a political stunt. here is boehner. >> the white house spends three weeks trying to develop a proposal and they send one up here that calls for $1.6 trillion in new taxes, calls for a little -- not even $400 billion in cuts, and they want to have this extra spending that is actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mean, it is -- it was not a serious proposal. and so right now we're almost nowhere. >> what we will do is continue to take this as a serious matter. this is not a game. we're not interested in playing rope adope. we're interested in trying to solve the problem for the american people so that we don't see taxes go up on anybody, so that we can engage in tax reform, get this economy going again. we're not playing a game. we're being serious. that offer yesterday was simply not serious. >> oh, boy. scrooge, rope-a-dope. where does that leave us after months of
house. president obama is adamant about protecting existing income tax rates for middle income earners and raising them on the wealthy. for the president the politics of this is very simple. he he ran on that issue and against republican obstructionism and won. if republicans don't relent on his issue, other fiscal cliff matters won't be discussed in the president's campaign to end the stalemate will continue. -election pond time since winning re-election, president obama welcomed the applause of hand-picked supporters and wa his calls tolicans not to ignore is calls to protect middle class households. >> it's time for us to work on >> reportel agreed to, which is allow eep middle class tax cuts for >> tax cuts for households that earn more than $250,000 to in a expire. increase.complicity and tax rate theyease. sted.hey're not interested. >> you're not going to grow the ou raiseif you raise tax rates on the top two rates. smalll hurt small businesses. econill hurt our economy. approach.y this is not the right r: toach. anythis impasse is one of many geithnerreasury secretary tim geith
that fiscal cliff. we know that the tax hikes go up. some estimates -- ben bernanke, the fed chairman, fears that it will throw the country into a recession. that would hurt the whole country, of course president obama as well. they have to be careful here as well. but democrats and the president clearly believe that they have the leverage to force an increase in these tax rates on the upper income americans before they agree to a deal. >> we'll all be watching the stock market as well. if that indeed happen. >>> the president is also concentrating on recasting his new cabinet and one name that came up yesterday is a replacement for leon panetta at the defense department. actually a republican, chuck hagel. former senator from nebraska. >> it's possible, but this is a real game of musical chairs right now. the president has to fill at least three big jobs, secretary of state, hillary clinton, defense and cia. and if the president does not choose susan rice that means john kerry goes to state and hagel goes to defense. if he chooses kerry for state then you could end up having hagel go to cia
obama is returning to a tactic that he's used in the past. he's taken the pitch on taxes directly to the american people in a trip to pennsylvania today. house speaker john boehner not so happy about it. let's listen for a minute -- >> listen, this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. and this is a moment for adult leadership. campaign-style rallies and one-sided leaks in the press are not the way to get things done here in washington. >> well, republicans are reportedly planning their own fiscal cliff pr campaign designed to show that the democrats are simply digging in, they're being stubborn, election is over, shouldn't both sides be focused on doing the job they were elected to do. how do you see it? >> look, you're going to have a bunch of rallying on both sides and some of this is theatrics. it's christmastime. you know how you tell your kids you have to be really good or santa's not going to give you what you want but you know you will buy them the new ps-3 anyway. that's what's going on. both sides realize it's political death for eithe
in self defense. >>> republicans took the bait. they delivered a counter proposal to president obama's plan to avert the fiscal cliff. guess what, the white house rejected it, calling the gop proposal unbalanced and not serious. translation? no tax hikes on the wealthy so democrats said forget about it. we thought you should take a look. it totals $2.2 trillion in deficit reduction over ten years. the part that stood out to us was $600 billion in proposed savings in medicare reforms. how? in part by raising the age of eligibility to 65 to maybe 67. turning down the gop proposal, dan pfieffer said, quote, it provides no details on which deductions they would eliminate, which loopholes they will close or which medicare savings they would achieve." let's head now to the white house and dan lothian. the white house will not offer a counter proposal, right? what's going on here? >> reporter: well, you know, i think the white house is digging in. the president said early on in this process that he would only sit down and really move forward, negotiate on this in any meaningful way if the t
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)